In Elyn’s junior year of high school, houses started talking to her. You are special. You are especially bad. Look closely and ye shall find. There are many things you must see. See. See. The houses weren’t speaking — not in the usual, audible sense— but nonetheless, they were transmitting their messages to her, through her own mind. “I instinctively knew they were not my ideas,” she explains in her autobiography,  The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness, “They belonged to the houses, and the houses had put them in my head.” Elyn has schizophrenia. She’s not “a schizophrenic.” This term, she holds, can be dismissive and pigeon-holing. Rather, she is a person with schizophrenia, and she has lived with the accompanying delusions, hallucinations…